kappamononitori:

kobayashicircle:

taynacious:

if you think you have a powerful fandom just remember that touhou fans made their own professional quality anime

Just remember that touhou fans made their own full-length Castlevania parody game with a full soundtrack, fantastic character art and professional voice actors. Twice.

Touhou:

image

Tumblr:

image

(via greatest-glyph)

guavasaur:

because somehow ive managed to geet 870 AWESOME PEOPLE FOLLOWING ME 
I HAVE NO IDEA HOW BUT WOW HELLO I HOPE YOUVE ENJOYED YOUR STAY 
"But Cam, what could we even win from a givaway? what could your tiny feathered arms possibly give us?"
IM GLAD YOU ASKED 

One WINNAR will get a clean-lined fullbody (or headshot if they prefer!), color picture of WHATEVER THEY WANT!
Second and third place will get a bouncy pixel each of whatever they want! >Example here<


DA RULES

1 Reblog, and 1 Like!
You gotta be following me, sorry pal!

GIVAWAY ENDS AUGUST 28TH 
HORRAY

guavasaur:

because somehow ive managed to geet 870 AWESOME PEOPLE FOLLOWING ME 

I HAVE NO IDEA HOW BUT WOW HELLO I HOPE YOUVE ENJOYED YOUR STAY 

"But Cam, what could we even win from a givaway? what could your tiny feathered arms possibly give us?"

IM GLAD YOU ASKED 

  • One WINNAR will get a clean-lined fullbody (or headshot if they prefer!), color picture of WHATEVER THEY WANT!
  • Second and third place will get a bouncy pixel each of whatever they want! >Example here<

DA RULES

  • 1 Reblog, and 1 Like!
  • You gotta be following me, sorry pal!

GIVAWAY ENDS AUGUST 28TH 

HORRAY

(via lechet)

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.

The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.

So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:

Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.

Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.

So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?

The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:

For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 

Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.

In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 

In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.

The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.

The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:

  • She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
  • The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
  • Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
  • Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
  • Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
  • Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)

This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.

I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  

Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.

Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:

  1. ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
  2. MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
  3. If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.

The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.

Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

(via obsidiandragon)

welcome-to-the-crying-parade:

stupidd-chan:

here’s a dating tip
if your partner suffers social anxiety or is an introvert, do not force them to go out on a date or hang out with you. more than likely, being alone relaxes their anxiety and recharges their energy. so respect that. and don’t bug them about it or take it personally. you’ll make their anxiety worse or just end up making them feel guilty as shit.
this goes for friends too. don’t do that to your friends.

Someone finally said it

Yo but like introversion is not the same thing as social anxiety and I feel like conflating the two is kind of silly (and potentially harmful)? Like I’m introverted as all fuck but nagging me to go out would not in any way make me anxious or cause me any harm.

IDEK maybe I’m talking out of turn, not having social anxiety myself but bluh.

The message is still good wrt people who do have social anxiety tho.

(via femmeanime)

stfuprolifers:

the-elderscrolls:

Polish doctor that refused to perform abortion named a “hero”
Dr Bogdan Chazan was visited by an expecting mother (32 weeks into pregnancy), who already had 5 miscarriages before and was worried about her health. It turned out that the fetus had hydrocephalus, undeveloped brain and was missing many bones from its skull. The Doctor refused to perform an abortion and didn’t send the woman to another hospital which could do so (according to polish law, if a doctor doesn’t want to perform an abortion, he has to choose another hospital which will agree to do so). Chazan was named a “local hero” and “true warrior of Jesus in the name of life of the unborn” by many polish politicians and catholic activists. He used conscience clause as an excuse for his actions.
The woman gave birth to the child through a C-section. She and her husband spent 10 painful days watching their deformed child die a horrible death. When she finally decided to speak out, she said:
“During these 10 days, no priest, no pro life activist or even dr Chazan came to see the child, to ask if they can help. It was really hard to look at our child. We knew what was coming, but it was still very hard to cope with”
Congratulations, pro-lifers - another “life” saved, another “happy” child and “happy” family. 

Reblogging again because this is the “good” that anti-choicers do in this world.
Forsake actual people for their oppressive beliefs.
And in the end, did they even really care about the fetus or the family?
Nope.

stfuprolifers:

the-elderscrolls:

Polish doctor that refused to perform abortion named a “hero”

Dr Bogdan Chazan was visited by an expecting mother (32 weeks into pregnancy), who already had 5 miscarriages before and was worried about her health. It turned out that the fetus had hydrocephalus, undeveloped brain and was missing many bones from its skull. The Doctor refused to perform an abortion and didn’t send the woman to another hospital which could do so (according to polish law, if a doctor doesn’t want to perform an abortion, he has to choose another hospital which will agree to do so). Chazan was named a “local hero” and “true warrior of Jesus in the name of life of the unborn” by many polish politicians and catholic activists. He used conscience clause as an excuse for his actions.

The woman gave birth to the child through a C-section. She and her husband spent 10 painful days watching their deformed child die a horrible death. When she finally decided to speak out, she said:

During these 10 days, no priest, no pro life activist or even dr Chazan came to see the child, to ask if they can help. It was really hard to look at our child. We knew what was coming, but it was still very hard to cope with

Congratulations, pro-lifers - another “life” saved, another “happy” child and “happy” family. 

Reblogging again because this is the “good” that anti-choicers do in this world.

Forsake actual people for their oppressive beliefs.

And in the end, did they even really care about the fetus or the family?

Nope.

(via femmeanime)

hylianears:

micdotcom:

Canadian music festival takes huge step against Native appropriation

Follow micdotcom 

From their announcement:

For various reasons, Bass Coast Festival is banning feathered war bonnets, or anything resembling them, onsite. Our security team will be enforcing this policy.

We understand why people are attracted to war bonnets. They have a magnificent aesthetic. But their spiritual, cultural and aesthetic significance cannot be separated.

Bass Coast Festival takes place on indigenous land and we respect the dignity of aboriginal people. We have consulted with aboriginal people in British Columbia on this issue and we feel our policy aligns with their views and wishes regarding the subject. Their opinion is what matters to us.

(via fancycake)

10:29 Then Joshua passed from Makkedah, and all Israel understood that day that Lara’s mother realized that she could have simply written (define (expmod base exp m) (remainder (fast-expt base exp) m))

(Source: kingjamesprogramming)

allthecanadianpolitics:

Canada’s crime rate continued downward trend in 2013

Canada’s crime rate fell by eight per cent over the previous year in 2013, according to police-reported crime numbers released today by Statistics Canada.

Reports of some offences did go up last year, however, including extortion, child pornography, aggravated sexual assault, sexual violations against children and identity fraud.

Continue Reading.

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

(via oshkeet)